Flick Ranch

Despite the idyllic ranch location, the second Bishop of Reno, Robert J. Dwyer, moved the school to an area northwest of the University of Nevada in 1957. The school continued to grow becoming an outstanding institution in the community. The school moved to a third location in South Reno and the second location has since been replaced by a women's softball field for University students.

During the School's 9 years at the ranch, the students enjoyed all the modern amenities. The ranch house's bedrooms were converted to classrooms, there was a cafeteria, study, and science lab. To the west of the school was constructed a Quonset-style building that housed the gymnasium as well as more classrooms. The students quickly became competitive in interscholastic sports. They held parent/faculty meetings, fundraisers and school dances in addition to classes in the idyllic ranch house great room.

The first graduating class of 1950 consisted of 14 students: 8 boys and 6 girls. The school grew and the next graduating class increased to 37 students. Graduates went on to become lawyers, engineers, military generals, spiritual leaders and business owners, many of who stayed in or returned the Truckee Meadows.

A strong alumni association supports the school at its third location today. Those who attended school at the Flick Ranch reunited recently, with 70 couples in attendance.

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The Reno Diocese came to own the 14 acre property previously known as the Flick Ranch and Bishop Thomas K. Gorman, the first Bishop of the Reno Diocese, opened the ranch house on September 13th 1948. With Joseph Linde, a diocesan priest, as the first principal the school opened to Freshman, Sophomore and Junior classes consisting of a total of 40 students.

 

The school was named after Bishop Patrick Manogue who, as a young man with a mining background in California, was well suited for his assignment in Virginia City Nevada where he served for 20 years during the height of the mining boom. Father Manogue was consecrated coadjutor bishop of Grass Valley in 1881 and took over the Grass Valley diocese that held jurisdiction over Northern Nevada in 1884. Given the association of Bishop Manogue to Northern Nevada, the namesake seemed appropriate and to this day, the student body is known as the "Manogue Miners."

This  facility was the first Bishop Manogue Catholic High School. When it first opened its doors, in September 1948, Manogue was the only Catholic High School in the state of Nevada. Today there are two Catholic High School in the state but Manogue is the only one in the Diocese of Reno, which covers all of Northern Nevada.

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The School

1948-1957